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Arlington’s Englert becomes Eagle Scout

Kennedy Englert’s volunteers look on as he explains how to install the firepits at the Country Charm Park and Recreation Area in Arlington. - Courtesy Photo
Kennedy Englert’s volunteers look on as he explains how to install the firepits at the Country Charm Park and Recreation Area in Arlington.
— image credit: Courtesy Photo

ARLINGTON — Although Kennedy Englert of Boy Scout Troop 92 has since turned 15, he was only 14 when he was just recently awarded his Eagle Scout Rank at a Court of Honor in the Stillaguamish Valley Pioneer Hall.

“I always wanted to be like the older kids who were the leaders,” said Englert, an Arlington High School freshman who’s served as an assistant patrol leader and patrol leader, as well as scribe, before taking on his current role as the senior patrol leader for Troop 92. He’s also earned 23 merit badges and is working on his automotive maintenance, cooking and biking merit badges.

Englert’s career in Scouting started in first grade, when he became a Tiger Cub, and culminated with his Eagle Scout service project to install 24 campfire rings and build two large picnic tables at the Country Charm Park and Recreation Area in Arlington.

“It took practically the whole troop,” said Englert, who enlisted 27 volunteers from the Scouts and family members of Troop 92 to devote 180 hours to completing the project, which he worked with city of Arlington Natural Resources Director Bill Blake to coordinate.

While Englert’s father Dave assisted with the construction, the city of Arlington purchased the concrete from Arlington Hardware & Lumber. Englert estimated that at least 80 hours were spent on planning, while the manual labor took place over the course of two Saturdays.

“I double-checked all the measurements,” Englert said. “The first weekend, we dug the holes. The second weekend, we poured the concrete and set the rings at a level so that they wouldn’t flood out.”

In the wake of his March 4 Court of Honor, Englert is still looking forward to three more years of Scouting, and plans to train as an assistant scoutmaster so that he can become a full scoutmaster after he’s aged out of being a Scout himself.

“I’ll try to pass on my knowledge and experience to other Scouts, to guide them toward becoming Eagle Scouts themselves,” Englert said. “I want to stay in as long as I can to help younger kids along their paths.”

“I’m happy that Scouting has been here to help mold boys into young men,” Englert’s mom Teri said. “We’re very grateful to all the adult volunteers who have given of their time for these outings as well.”

 

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