Community

Helping Hands distributes $20,000 to local organizations

From left, Helping Hands president Roland Kirby, vice president Shirley Cochinella and Shirley McLane unpack a bag of donations to sell at Helping Hands in Arlington.  -
From left, Helping Hands president Roland Kirby, vice president Shirley Cochinella and Shirley McLane unpack a bag of donations to sell at Helping Hands in Arlington.
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ARLINGTON — Helping Hands is excited to report that they are distributing $20,000 to various organizations this year, after an extra special year.

“In recent years we have given around $12,000,” said Lana Lasley, secretary to the organization that resells second-hand clothing and housewares to people in need.

They are donating their proceeds from the past year to the Arlington Boys and Girls Club, Make a Wish Foundation, Arlington’s Cocoon House, Arlington Food Bank, Support 46, Youth Dynamics, Domestic Violence, Dollars for Scholars and the Arlington High School Band, according to president Roland Kirby.

Helping Hands was founded about 30 years ago to sell second-hand goods to raise money for community organizations that serve youth. The second-hand store uses a building provided by the city of Arlington right next door to the Arlington Food Bank, although the city is currently seeking a new location for both agencies.

“We are outgrowing this place anyway,” said Shirley Cochinella.

“We’d like to thank all of our customers and donors and the city of Arlington maintenance crews who help keep the front yard clear of junk that is often dumped here,” Kirby said. Helping Hands is run by 10 volunteers who open the doors to customers from 9 a.m. to noon Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 127 W. Cox St. next to Haller Park.

“We always welcome good, clean donations,” Kirby said. “Please don’t give us broken furniture or exercise equipment, it doesn’t sell.”

More good deeds

• Haggen Food & Pharmacy store around the Northwest collected more than 9,000 pounds of coats in all our stores and a little over $1,000 cash. This is down slightly from last year, but it does not include some of our locations where the Northwest Center did not pick up at. We found local community groups in areas where the Northwest Center could not pick up so all our stores could participate.

“All in all it was another very successful campaign,” said Becky Skaggs.

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