Community

CT’s newest Park and ride opens in Marysville

From left, Community Transit Board member and Marysville Mayor Dennis Kendall, CT CEO Joyce Eleanor and Board Chair Carlton Gipson, seen here after unleashing the balloon palm trees dedicating the Community Transit park and ride station at the intersection of Cedar Avenue and Grove Street Dec. 15. - Kirk Boxleitner
From left, Community Transit Board member and Marysville Mayor Dennis Kendall, CT CEO Joyce Eleanor and Board Chair Carlton Gipson, seen here after unleashing the balloon palm trees dedicating the Community Transit park and ride station at the intersection of Cedar Avenue and Grove Street Dec. 15.
— image credit: Kirk Boxleitner

MARYSVILLE — Two weeks after it opened for business, the Community Transit park and ride station at the intersection of Cedar Avenue and Grove Street was officially dedicated Dec. 15 by CT CEO Joyce Eleanor and Board Chair Carlton Gipson, as well as CT Board member and Marysville Mayor Dennis Kendall.

Eleanor noted that the city of Marysville was one of the founding members of Community Transit in 1996 and explained that the Cedar and Grove park and ride station includes 213 parking spaces, with additional parking for motorcycles and bicycles, and room for up to three buses. Its three routes are 207 to Boeing in Everett, 421 to downtown Seattle and 821 to the University District.

Eleanor cited route 821 as a money-saver for Community Transit, since route 421 passengers can connect to route 821 at the Cedar and Grove park and ride, thereby allowing CT to serve both areas at a lower cost and spend that money in other areas. She likewise touted the park and ride’s one-block proximity to State Avenue, where buses stop every 15 minutes according to Kendall.

Gipson, who will retire from his position Dec. 31, joined Eleanor in praising those who contributed to the Cedar and Grove park and ride project, and recalled not only the July groundbreaking of that park and ride, but also the growing need that had inspired the creation of Marysville’s three other park and ride stations before it.

“When the Ash Avenue park and ride opened six years ago, we already knew we would need another,” Gipson said.

Community Transit evaluated 20 potential sites in Marysville, Tulalip and Arlington, before choosing the Cedar and Grove lot. Gipson pointed out that it was flat, undeveloped, centrally located and easily accessible to State Avenue and I-5.

Kendall, the 2008 Board chair for Community Transit, expressed the belief that the Cedar and Grove park and ride is especially important in light of the city of Marysville’s annexation of approximately 20,000 residents at the end of this year.

“As elected officials, we’re looking to provide our citizens with affordable mobility,” Kendall said.

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