Arts and Entertainment

Fishsticks owners show work in containers, containment and contents

A German-style basket by Marysville craftsman Bill Roeder is one of two baskets he has included in the Containers, Containment and Contents show currently on display at the Everett Center for the Arts in the Monte Cristo, presented by the Arts Council of Snohomish County. Roeder and Judy Zugish founded Fishsticks Basketry School in Marysville 17 years ago.  - Courtesy photo
A German-style basket by Marysville craftsman Bill Roeder is one of two baskets he has included in the Containers, Containment and Contents show currently on display at the Everett Center for the Arts in the Monte Cristo, presented by the Arts Council of Snohomish County. Roeder and Judy Zugish founded Fishsticks Basketry School in Marysville 17 years ago.
— image credit: Courtesy photo

Hidden behind the railroad tracks near 80th Street in Marysville, Bill Roeder and Judy Zugish established Fishsticks 17 years ago, combining creativity, business skills and the desire to develop an educational resource in basketry.

They are each showing two baskets in a show featuring Northwest Designer Craftsmen and Northwest basket weavers through Feb. 12 presented by the Arts Council of Snohomish County.

A truly creative artist, Zugish developed fresh ideas, using fresh herbs grown in their garden, Bouquet Banque. Through the years she has offered classes on making a variety of different baskets from materials found in the yard.

Roeder, on the other hand, is a technical craftsman, creating and teaching traditional basketry in ribbed, molded and woven styles using refined materials. He places emphasis on traditional techniques and materials, especially reed, willow, cane and bamboo. A specialist in the preparation of materials such as skeined willow and bamboo, Roeder studied at the German Basketry School in 2003 and 2005. He taught skeined willow at John Campbell Folk School in Nov. 2003. In 2007, he returned to Germany for private lessons with Herr Schneider, a retired director of the school.

Zugish is less traditional in her approach, using a variety of materials not often found in basket making. She teaches across the United States as well as in their garden studio in Marysville. Her work is displayed in a number of galleries in the Northwest and throughout the country, and has shown internationally as well. Zugish has also studied in Europe, Southeast Asia, Japan and Australia.

The partners in life and work, their classroom workshop is set amidst a two-acre nursery and perennial gardens, Bouquet Banque.

They hosted a famous Russian basket maker in the fall of 2008 and bring to town periodically guest teachers from as far as London and Tokyo as well as from across the United States.

Zugish also offers her own classes at all levels at the garden studio and in Rugby, Tenn.

Her classes explore natural materials, both wild and from the garden. She also teaches at conventions and invitational venues across the United States.

In 1998, Zugish and Roeder organized a tour of basketry and gardens in the Kyushu Prefecture of Japan. In the fall of 2002, they took a small group to the West Country of England for a personalized tour of willow basketry and gardens.

Bouquet Banque Nursery is truly a basketmaker’s garden where a mature planting of perennials and old-fashioned shrubbery greet visitors.

The garden at 8220 State Ave. is open by appointment.

Call 360-659-4938 or e-mail to fishsticks@greatnorthern.net.

The Everett basket art show is planned in correlation with a traveling exhibition, “Intertwined: Contemporary Baskets from the Sara and David Lieberman Collection,” on display at the Bellevue Art Museum through March 22. The Arts Council of Snohomish County gallery is located at 1507 Wall St. in Everett. The gallery is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays. For information call 425-257-8380 or check the Web site at www.artscouncilofsnoco.org.

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