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Archive Results — 251 thru 275 of about 9875 items

Arlington Library bond vote remains too close to call

  • May 22, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Aug 28, 2008 at 4:59PM

ARLINGTON The final tally of votes has yet to be counted, but the current percentages indicate that the Arlington Library bond election remains a close race.

Flowers By George celebrates 40 years

  • May 28, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Aug 28, 2008 at 4:59PM

ARLINGTON Flowers By George opened its doors 40 years ago, on June 1, 1968, and since then George Boulton and his family and employees have created an institution of service in the Arlington community.

Library falling short of needed super-majority

  • May 28, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Aug 28, 2008 at 4:59PM

ARLINGTON The final total of votes has yet to be counted, but the current percentages indicate that this year's Arlington Library bond election could be defeated by a wider margin than in the November 2006 election.

Father Dalton looks back on service

  • May 28, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Aug 28, 2008 at 4:59PM

ARLINGTON Father Jim Dalton is on the cusp of a couple of important anniversaries.

Olga Rogneby turns 100

  • May 28, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Aug 28, 2008 at 4:59PM

ARLINGTON A child of the Stillaguamish Valley, Olga Hamilton Hoidal Rogneby turns 100 Thursday, May 29.

Fallen vets honored in Arlington

  • May 28, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Aug 28, 2008 at 4:58PM

ARLINGTON Local veterans and their loved ones joined area scouts, students and other civilians on this year's observance of Memorial Day, May 26, to commemorate those military members who have given their lives in service to their country.

This week in history from The Arlington Times archives 10 years ago 1998

  • May 28, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Aug 28, 2008 at 4:58PM

n Major corporations involved in forestry, mining and fisheries bank on the public's belief in the idea of the balance of nature. But Mike Fellows, a science teacher at Lakewood High School, says "balance of nature is a fallacy." At least it is if chaos theory is correct and chaos theory is gaining credibility within the scientific community. Fellows' involvement with the scientific community at the university level helps fuel his passion for science, thinking the questions and searching for answers. Through his passion for exploring and learning, Fellows is bringing high-level physics and biology to Lakewood students. His classes encourage students to think critically, pose questions and organize experiments to determine answers. Through direct involvement in experiments, Fellows is illustrating to students that changes in environment can produce extreme consequences. So even in a sterile setting where the environment is controlled, there are always tiny variations that can be imperceptible, but can change the outcome of an experiment. With that premise, if an environment is changed through activities like logging, excavating or drag-net fishing, it is wrong to assume balance can be restored when the global and/or long-term effects of these changes is not known. Through hands-on experiments, Lakewood students are testing for the how and why of chaos theory and its practical application. Some of this advance biology research is because of their teacher's involvement in the Partnership in Science program. The program has helped pay for some special pieces of equipment. Partnership in Science is a mentorship program that gives high school teachers an opportunity to do vanguard research and work with colleagues at the university level. Fellows said he was fortunate he was picked to participate in the program for the last two years. As part of his involvement, Fellows won an exit grant of $3,000 as long as there was a community match of $2,000. Fellows said the local branch of Washington Mutual Bank put in most of the matching $2,000 with the balance coming from other community donations to the school. With the grant and the matching money, Fellows bought some nifty equipment allowing students to do advanced lab experiments. To test chaos theory and its premise that slight variations can cause major changes, students created small environmental "landscapes," miniature replicas of an ecological system found in nature. They will then test the effect of poison (in this case copper sulfate) on the environmental landscape. In an eight-week experiment, students created the landscapes (as well as a controlled landscape they used for comparison) in jars by putting together measured amounts of lake water, sand, sterilized straw and three types of algae.

Back in the day…

  • May 28, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Aug 27, 2008 at 6:02PM

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS LEGALNOTICES

  • May 28, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Aug 28, 2008 at 4:58PM

Mold Remediation Services

Jensen repeats as state discus champ

  • May 28, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Aug 28, 2008 at 5:17PM

PASCO Outstanding seniors bade farewell to their high school careers with outstanding performances at state.

Crawford wins second golfing title

  • May 28, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Aug 28, 2008 at 5:17PM

BELLINGHAM With a comfortable lead heading into the 18th hole, junior Craig Crawford wasn't aiming for the hole as he chipped onto the green from 20 yards out.

Animal art at Arlington Library

  • May 28, 2008 at 5:00AM

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES

  • May 28, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Aug 28, 2008 at 5:30PM

Arlington volunteer opportunities

MEETINGS

  • May 28, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Aug 28, 2008 at 5:29PM

Stillaguamish Senior Center, 18308 Smokey Pt. Blvd, Arlington 360-653-4551. Daily volunteer opportunities. Call Karen at ext. 228.

M-PHS honors its artists

  • May 28, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Aug 28, 2008 at 5:29PM

Art students at Marysville-Pilchuck High School shared a year's worth of talent at M-PHS May 20 - 22, when a three-day exhibit featured the talent of the school's many art students.

A&LSCAN

  • May 28, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Aug 28, 2008 at 5:29PM

May 30 is the deadline to enter art for the Arts Council of Snohomish County's Art of the Garden, which will run July 10 – Aug. 21. Any form of art to enhance the garden and bring the garden into the home is welcome, including paintings, photographs and sculpture. Artists may submit up to 12 slides or digital images, labeled with name, title and dimensions. Digital jpeg images should be 300 dpi, approximately 5- by 7-inch format. Include name and mailing address. Email to ccollver@artscouncilofsnoco.org or mail to Carie Collver, 1507 Wall St., Everett, WA 98201. For more information call 425-257-8380.

Taste of the Times

  • May 28, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Aug 28, 2008 at 5:29PM

We would like to encourage our readers to send in their favorite

CommunitY Calendar CENTERS

  • May 28, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Aug 28, 2008 at 5:29PM

For an exhaustive list of events submitted to our Calendar section, please visit our website at www.marysvilleglobe.com and www.arlingtontimes.com.

Slow food enjoyed at Ninety Farm

  • May 28, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Aug 28, 2008 at 5:22PM

Nearly 90 people gathered at Ninety Farm in Arlington to enjoy lunch at the farm recently. The members of Slow Food Seattle and friends were hosted by Linda Neunzig, who offered the city folk a chance to watch her Corgys chase the sheep, swing under the apple tree, and wander along the bank of the Stillaguamish River, while eating an expansive array of real food.

The importance of compost, mulch and fertilizer

  • May 28, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Aug 28, 2008 at 5:22PM

If I am remembered for nothing else when I die, it will probably be for the question I always ask my customers when they are purchasing plants: "Have you got some fertilizer and compost?" Beyond all the planting advice and horticultural wisdom, the single most tantamount message I want to leave with all of you is the importance of amending your soils with natural fertilizers and compost and covering them with some kind of organic mulch.

More last words on water

  • May 28, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Aug 28, 2008 at 5:47PM

To better understand Marysville's water situation, it helps to know what's happening elsewhere. Take Arapaho Falls, Colorado, for example. The small town of 9,300 is in shock following raids of local businesses by state police. Records were impounded and both management and employees were questioned. A state police spokesperson said that arrests may be expected.

City Council to deal with fireworks, again

  • May 28, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Aug 28, 2008 at 5:47PM

On Tuesday evening, after The Globe and The Times went to press, the Marysville City Council was slated to deal with the issue of the illegal use of fireworks. The proposal this time was to make the illegal use of fireworks a civil matter, rather than criminal, to make it easier to enforce the law.

The sound of silence

  • May 28, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Aug 28, 2008 at 5:47PM

On May 19, I became

Response to Mr. Kundu's Editorial

  • May 28, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Aug 28, 2008 at 5:47PM

Mr. Kundu's recent article chastising me and other skeptics of the man-made global warming theory couldn't have been more timely. Just this past week a petition was released signed by 31,000 scientists across the U.S. rejecting said theory. Where's the consensus now?

This week in history from The Arlington Times archives 10 years ago 1998

  • May 28, 2008 at 12:00AM updated Aug 28, 2008 at 4:58PM

n Major corporations involved in forestry, mining and fisheries bank on the public's belief in the idea of the balance of nature. But Mike Fellows, a science teacher at Lakewood High School, says "balance of nature is a fallacy." At least it is if chaos theory is correct and chaos theory is gaining credibility within the scientific community. Fellows' involvement with the scientific community at the university level helps fuel his passion for science, thinking the questions and searching for answers. Through his passion for exploring and learning, Fellows is bringing high-level physics and biology to Lakewood students. His classes encourage students to think critically, pose questions and organize experiments to determine answers. Through direct involvement in experiments, Fellows is illustrating to students that changes in environment can produce extreme consequences. So even in a sterile setting where the environment is controlled, there are always tiny variations that can be imperceptible, but can change the outcome of an experiment. With that premise, if an environment is changed through activities like logging, excavating or drag-net fishing, it is wrong to assume balance can be restored when the global and/or long-term effects of these changes is not known. Through hands-on experiments, Lakewood students are testing for the how and why of chaos theory and its practical application. Some of this advance biology research is because of their teacher's involvement in the Partnership in Science program. The program has helped pay for some special pieces of equipment. Partnership in Science is a mentorship program that gives high school teachers an opportunity to do vanguard research and work with colleagues at the university level. Fellows said he was fortunate he was picked to participate in the program for the last two years. As part of his involvement, Fellows won an exit grant of $3,000 as long as there was a community match of $2,000. Fellows said the local branch of Washington Mutual Bank put in most of the matching $2,000 with the balance coming from other community donations to the school. With the grant and the matching money, Fellows bought some nifty equipment allowing students to do advanced lab experiments. To test chaos theory and its premise that slight variations can cause major changes, students created small environmental "landscapes," miniature replicas of an ecological system found in nature. They will then test the effect of poison (in this case copper sulfate) on the environmental landscape. In an eight-week experiment, students created the landscapes (as well as a controlled landscape they used for comparison) in jars by putting together measured amounts of lake water, sand, sterilized straw and three types of algae.

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