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Arlington considers petition for annexation

Paul Ellis, director of economic and community development for the city of Arlington, presents a 10 percent petition for annexation, for approximately 42.77 acres located on the northeast side of the city of Arlington, to the Arlington City Council on Oct. 14. - Kirk Boxleitner
Paul Ellis, director of economic and community development for the city of Arlington, presents a 10 percent petition for annexation, for approximately 42.77 acres located on the northeast side of the city of Arlington, to the Arlington City Council on Oct. 14.
— image credit: Kirk Boxleitner

ARLINGTON — The Arlington City Council will consider on Monday, Oct. 21, whether to approve a 10 percent petition for annexation, for approximately 42.77 acres located on the northeast side of the city of Arlington.

Paul Ellis, director of economic and community development for the city of Arlington, explained to the City Council during their workshop meeting on Oct. 14, that the properties in question are within the city’s Urban Growth Area, and that the current city limits abut the proposed annexation area to the west, northwest, south and southeast.

“There are 33 property owners in the area, and three signed the petition, so that meets the required 10 percent,” Ellis said. “If the Council were to deny it, it would stop right there, but if they were to approve the proposed 10 percent petition for annexation, then the applicant would have 60 days to secure the support of property owners representing 60 percent of the assessed value within the area being proposed for annexation.”

Tveit Road borders the proposed area to the south, and 87th Avenue borders it on the west. The annexation does not include filling in all the property to the UGA boundary, since the lower parcels are in the flood plain.

The city’s comprehensive plan designates the properties as low to moderate density residential, and the zoning map pre-zones this area with the same designations.

“The applicant had already turned in a 10 percent petition for annexation in 2005, but stopped short of completing the 60 percent step, for reasons I don’t know,” Ellis said.

One benefit of annexation would be a reduction in property tax rates, from the county’s rate of $13.96 per $1,000 of assessed valuation, to the city’s rate of $12.78 per $1,000 of assessed valuation.

“On a $430,000 home value, the property tax in the county would be $6,129.10, and in the city it would be $5,504.71,” Ellis said. “The property tax rate would stay at the county rate until the annexation was completed, and accepted by the Arlington City Council and the Snohomish County Council.”

When Arlington City Council member Debora Nelson pressed Ellis to speculate on some other benefits of annexation to the property owners, Ellis noted that, “Theoretically, they could add more housing units, but they wouldn’t have any sewer hookups.”

“Would the city have to put in that sewer line?” fellow Council member Dick Butner asked.

“It’s my understanding that would be developer-driven,” Ellis said.

The Arlington City Council’s Oct. 21 meeting will start at 7 p.m. at 110 E. Third St.

 

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