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Arlington EMS gives tips to stay safe

Arlington-area firefighters and emergency medical services personnel Vance Deward, Doug Atkinson, Rachelle Zacher, Wayne Mitchell and Scott Hillis dispense brochures in front of the Haggen store May 26 in recognition of National EMS Week. -
Arlington-area firefighters and emergency medical services personnel Vance Deward, Doug Atkinson, Rachelle Zacher, Wayne Mitchell and Scott Hillis dispense brochures in front of the Haggen store May 26 in recognition of National EMS Week.
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ARLINGTON National Emergency Medical Services Week wrapped up over the Memorial Day weekend, but Arlington Fire Department Emergency Management Project Manager Christine Badger hopes the citys citizens will remember that emergency preparedness is a year-round responsibility.
Arlington firefighters and EMS personnel recognized National EMS Week by meeting with area residents May 26 in front of the Safeway and Haggen stores at the intersection of Hwy. 9 and 204th Street, to provide tips on how to stay safe, while community members received brochures and tours of the ambulances on site.
Arlington Fire Department Medical Services Administrator Doug Schmidt noted that the department has seven paramedics on staff to assist with advanced life support calls, and added that all paid firefighters, as well as a majority of volunteer firefighters, are trained as emergency medical technicians.
Arlington Fire Chief Jim Rankin pointed out that Arlington EMS provides services to the neighboring Arlington Heights Fire District 21, Oso Fire District 25 and Darrington and also conducts mutual aid with Marysville.
Arlington responded to more than 2,200 EMS calls within the last year alone, Rankin said. The compassion and expertise of our people makes Arlington EMS one of the best programs in Snohomish County.
Badger listed the questions that you should ask yourself to determine if you or someone you are with is in need of immediate medical treatment:
Is the victims condition life-threatening?
Could the victims condition worsen and become more life-threatening on the way to the hospital?
Does the victim require the skills or equipment of paramedics or EMTs?
Could the distance or traffic conditions cause a delay in getting the victim to the hospital?
If the answer to any of these questions is yes, or even if youre unsure of the answers, Badger recommends that you call EMS by dialing 9-1-1, since paramedics and EMTs can start medical treatments at the scene and on the way to the nearest available hospital, alerting its emergency department of the victims condition en route.
When you call for help, speak calmly and clearly, Badger said. Give your name, address and phone number, give the location of the victim and describe the problem. Do not hang up until the operator tells you to, because he or she may need more information, or they may need to give you instructions.

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