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Senior Center honors community leader

From left, Don Regans granddaughter Jamie Seldy and two daughters Cindy Richards and Terah Regan join Don and Lorraine Regan in front of the newly dedicated Don Regan Conference Room at the Stillaguamish Senior Center. The room was dedicated in Regans name with an official ceremony Monday, Feb. 26. -
From left, Don Regans granddaughter Jamie Seldy and two daughters Cindy Richards and Terah Regan join Don and Lorraine Regan in front of the newly dedicated Don Regan Conference Room at the Stillaguamish Senior Center. The room was dedicated in Regans name with an official ceremony Monday, Feb. 26.
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Stillaguamish Senior Center names board, conference room after board member Don Regan

ARLINGTON A former City Councilman and school board member, Don Regan served on the board of directors at the Stillaguamish Senior Center for more than 20 years, including two terms as president, and now he has been rewarded for all his hard work.
The senior center officially dedicated its board and conference room Monday, Feb. 26 in his honor, naming the room the Don Regan Conference Room.
Don has been one of those quiet leaders in our community for many years and hasnt received the recognition that he deserves, said the current president of the senior center board of directors, David Duskin.
He and Lorraine were the primary pancake breakfast cooks at the monthly pancake fundraising breakfasts and they regularly worked as volunteers at the weekly fundraising bingo sessions, Duskin said.
Regan was a school board member for two years in the early 1970s when the district hired Dick Post. He was on the City Council for 15 years, stepping down in 2000, and was one of the founders and directors of the Bank of Arlington serving on the board as it transformed to Frontier Bank.
Now a resident of Robinhood Drive on the top of the hill in old town Arlington, Regan milked 50 cows on his dairy farm south of Arlington until 1979.
That was back in the days of old-fashioned milking equipment, Regan said. His farm is now home to High Clover housing development.
During the dedication ceremony, Duskin reminisced about the old days when then councilmen Bob Kraski, Tim Simmons and Jim Jones lived on the same street as Regan.
The hill to Robinhood Drive was always the first to be sanded by the city crews, Duskin joked. Simmons was a former director at the senior center as well.
Mayor Margaret Larson remembers Don Regan when he was on City Council with her husband, then Mayor John Larson.
Don was always the voice of reason, Larson said. No financial decision was made without Dons input. Larson also said the whole Regan family has been active in the community.
Regan resigned from the senior centers board of directors two years ago after having a stroke.
I couldnt drive anymore, Regan said. He remember why he donated his time so freely.
Because I liked being around people, he said.
Regan said he sometimes worries about the future of the community because people are so busy these days.
Nobody has time to volunteer anymore, he said.
Regan was also made a life-time honorary board member of the Stillaguamish Senior Center.

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