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Career, College Fair an eye-opener for Arlington students

For Arlington High School freshmen such as 14-year-olds Goniga Johnson, left, and Klarissa Kaldiste, right, the Career and College Fair received high marks for being informative, but lost some points for being a bit intimidating, with Johnson claiming there were too many people. -
For Arlington High School freshmen such as 14-year-olds Goniga Johnson, left, and Klarissa Kaldiste, right, the Career and College Fair received high marks for being informative, but lost some points for being a bit intimidating, with Johnson claiming there were too many people.
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EVERETT For 150 Arlington and Weston High School students, this years Career and College Fair at the Everett Events Center Oct. 25 was their first time attending the event, which featured more than 30 colleges and universities, as well as 16 career training booths.
According to Janet Mustered, the school-to-career coordinator for the Arlington public schools who works at AHS, last year was technically the Arlington School Districts first time at the Career and College Fair, but only 10 students could attend the event.
Hands-on exhibits were in abundance, among them a mannequin used by the Everett Community Colleges Nursing and Medical Assistance Program to teach its students how to dress and change wounds properly.
Francie Mooney, a certified medical assistant and instructional technician, demonstrated to high school students how open wounds might be packed with gauze, covered, cleaned and changed in the field.
These bandages lace up like shoes, to hold in your stomach when you move, said Mooney, who also enlightened students about how surgical staples often leave less scarring than stitches.
The material science and technology of Edmonds Community College was represented by industry liaison Gene Fusch and instructor David Wood, who showed off the 45-pound downhill single-person racing model, that their department had built out of basalt, as an example of what could be achieved through the development of lightweight, energy-efficient new materials.
Weve developing substances that are stronger than steel and lighter than aluminum, Fusch said, who also touted their ability to rapid prototype the models they build.
While the branches of the armed forces boasted a chin-up bar and recruitment videos, their message was less concerned with change than with constancy.
Marine Sgt. Ricky Pena simply wanted area high school students to know that the military still exists as a career option, both as a reminder to those who are already aware of its benefits, and as a primer to those who hadnt heard about it yet.
Were an all-volunteer service that plays a critical role in the world, Pena said.
For AHS freshmen such as 14-year-olds Klarissa Kaldiste and Goniga Johnson, the Career and College Fair received high marks for being informative, but lost some points for being a bit intimidating, with Johnson claiming there were too many people.
Kaldistes primary career choice remains firefighting, but the Washington State University booth piqued her interest, just as the construction companies did for both her and Johnson, currently an aspiring cosmetologist.
AHS freshmen Alex Cassel and Joshua Tanner didnt share their classmates discomfort with the events size or population, but wished its layout could have been more diversified.
Nonetheless, Tanner found himself drawn to the possibilities of the culinary arts, as well as to the Navys descriptions of their construction-working Seabees, while Cassel simply asserted that it was really cool how many career choices were on display.
Mustered herself admitted that the Career and College Fair could be overwhelming, but still considered it a great exposure to the careers our students could pursue, especially for our freshmen. I liked the way they did it. It was very well done and comprehensive, and it was well worth the effort.

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