News

Stillaguamish Tribe hands out impact monies

The Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians checks draw smiles from representatives of Arlington Police, Arlington Fire and North County Fire and EMS.  From left, Arlington Police Chief John Gray, Arlington Fire Chief Jim Rankin, Stillaguamish Tribal Chair Shawn Yanity, and North County Fire and EMS Chief Dale Fulfs and Capt. Eric Ensign. -
The Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians checks draw smiles from representatives of Arlington Police, Arlington Fire and North County Fire and EMS. From left, Arlington Police Chief John Gray, Arlington Fire Chief Jim Rankin, Stillaguamish Tribal Chair Shawn Yanity, and North County Fire and EMS Chief Dale Fulfs and Capt. Eric Ensign.
— image credit:

SMOKEY POINT The Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians distributed checks for impact monies to representatives of Arlington Police, Arlington Fire and North County Fire and EMS in the Tribes Smokey Point offices March 28.
Stillaguamish Tribal Chair Shawn Yanity dispensed $30,000 to North County Fire and EMS, $12,000 to Arlington Fire and $4,525 to Arlington Police.
The police department is just one part of a safety system, and the Tribe has been a big partner in helping us make the community stronger, said Arlington Police Chief John Gray, who received funds for video recording systems in police vehicles, as well as two spare systems from the Stillaguamish Tribal Police. With this tool we can hold impaired drivers and our own officers accountable.
Arlington Fires funds will go toward a water safety and rescue program.
With this, well be training and equipping existing and additional personnel, Arlington Fire Chief Jim Rankin said. These incidents involve all of us.
North County Fire and EMS Chief Dale Fulfs and Capt. Eric Ensign accepted funds for a rescue vehicle to pull their boat.
Its been a pleasure working with the Tribe and the casino, Fulfs said. Youve been a big asset to us.
We really like using your water, Ensign said.
Rankin extended an invitation to the Tribe to join the emergency management program being jointly coordinated by the city of Arlington, the Arlington School District and the Cascade Valley Hospital and Clinics.
We want to help you and us in turn, Rankin said. Its an opportunity to be represented in our emergency operations center. Were putting a really big emphasis on community preparedness because, realistically, people should be able to sustain themselves for as long as seven days in the event of a major disaster.
Yanity expressed enthusiasm for the reciprocal support between the Tribe and outside public safety agencies, which he considered part of the Tribes obligations as a good neighbor and a good host.
Were inviting folks onto our lands, so we need to make sure theyre safe, Yanity said. When we designed the plans for the casino, we asked the fire departments what we needed to do, and we made sure that local law enforcement and emergency services could cover the area. Our tribe lives right in the community. Our kids go to your schools. When we invest in you, were investing in us. Were proud to call Arlington our home.

We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story's topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use. Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus

Read the latest Green Edition

Browse the print edition page by page, including stories and ads.

Oct 18 edition online now. Browse the archives.