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Trafton Fair draws crowds, supports school

From left, Savanna Solter was a bit worried when she started her pony ride at the Trafton Fair, courtesy of Langs Horse and Pony Farm in Mount Vernon, but she soon warmed to the experience, with the help of Mary Van Phan, of Marys Child Care, and Jessica Teets, whose husband Brian was one of at least 20 Navy volunteers at the Trafton Fair. -
From left, Savanna Solter was a bit worried when she started her pony ride at the Trafton Fair, courtesy of Langs Horse and Pony Farm in Mount Vernon, but she soon warmed to the experience, with the help of Mary Van Phan, of Marys Child Care, and Jessica Teets, whose husband Brian was one of at least 20 Navy volunteers at the Trafton Fair.
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ARLINGTON The Trafton Fair has been benefiting Trafton Elementary School since its inception in 1954, but according to Trafton Parent-Teacher Club President Lanette Ziegler, the event has always gotten bigger, attracted more attendees and raised more funds with each passing year.
We served at least 550 meals, Ziegler said. We used to stage events in the field next to the school, but thats been completely filled by parking.
For the past 52 years, on the last Friday of every September, visitors to Trafton Elementary have found carnival games, live animals, food, face-painting, clowns, raffles for children and adults, music and booths for crafts and bakery items.
The proceeds generated by this event have gone toward field trips, playground equipment, ceremonies and awards to recognize student achievement and other programs and resources intended to improve the students learning and quality of life.
Almost all of these activities and materials are donated by people in the community, Ziegler said. The Parent-Teacher Club buys the hamburger patties, pays for the pony rides and pays for the school district buses, so that the Arlington High School Jazz Band and our students pen-pals at the other schools can come here. But the fire department fills our dunk tank and the Navy provides at least 20 volunteers to man our booths.
As Arlington High Schools Jazzmine and the Old-Time Fiddlers provided music for the days festivities, bids at the silent auction tables and purchases at the Country Store of arts and crafts contributed by students and families generated a significant percentage of the proceeds, with the silent auctions alone earning approximately $2,400 toward this years total of $8,800.
This is our only fundraiser for the year, said Ziegler, who explained that a core group of 10 participants were most active in setting up the fair, but more than 150 volunteers had also helped put the event together, not including major donors. Former students and parents whose kids have long since graduated from here still donate their time and money to help out. Even the current crop of Trafton kids get so excited and ask what they can do to help, rather than just waiting for the bell to ring so they can go out and play.

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