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Arlington assault victim dies; police switch to homicide investigation

ARLINGTON — A 40-year-old Arlington man has died from injuries he suffered in an assault Saturday, Dec. 12.

Elliot Carbajal passed away just after 10:15 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 16, at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle.

Carbajal had been on life support at the hospital since allegedly being assaulted by 40-year-old Robert L. Carlson during the early morning hours of Dec. 12, according to court documents.

Carlson was charged with first-degree assault in Everett District Court Tuesday, Dec. 15, and is currently being held on $1 million bail.

Those charges could change as Arlington Police Department detectives are now investigating the case as a homicide, Banfield said.

An autopsy on the victim was scheduled to take place Thursday, Dec. 17.

According to court documents filed Dec. 12, Carlson and his son, Robert J. Carlson, allegedly confronted and attacked Carbajal at Fourth Street and North Olympic Avenue in downtown Arlington just after 1 a.m. Dec. 12.

Police responded to the assault in progress and administered CPR to Carbajal, who was found on the ground unresponsive, according to the documents.

Carbajal was airlifted to Harborview.

Authorities also arrested the Carlson's 21-year-old son at the scene on other outstanding warrants.

Detectives are still investigating the case, and residents with any information are encouraged to call the Arlington Police Department at 360-403-3400.

Previous stories about the case are located here, here and here.

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