Arlington City Council to discuss fireworks ban

ARLINGTON – The City Council is considering a ban on fireworks and will discuss several options at a work session later in July.

Existing city laws restrict discharging fireworks from only 9 a.m. to midnight on July 4th and Dec. 31 from 7 p.m. to midnight.

City Administrator Paul Ellis passed out a brief memo to the City Council Monday outlining options for a discussion on fireworks that range from an advisory vote ballot measure, a council-initiated ban or further restrictions in the event of emergency conditions, such as high fire danger.

“This is just to kind of help give us some direction and give council an idea on timelines,” said Ellis, if they choose to change the la

The council has tentatively scheduled the discussion for July 22, providing enough time for staff to compile fireworks-related information and the public to share comments with the council and City Hall. The council recesses in August.

City spokeswoman Kristin Banfield said council discussions about fireworks after the Fourth of July are a common occurrence.

In the past, complaints from citizens have been about noise, concern about children injuring themselves, pets, trauma and veterans. Officials have responded with more fireworks safety education.

This year the issue seems to be a little bit more prominent and gaining traction, Banfield said.

“We’re seeing more complaints based on fire risk and fire danger because things are drier now,” she said. Officials received half a dozen complaints last year, and more are coming before the holiday.

Banfield said traditionally Arlington residents have been split down the middle about whether to ban fireworks or let neighbors continue to enjoy fireworks in their Independence Day celebrating.

“It’s a difficult conversation,” she said.

Ellis provided four options:

• Put an advisory vote on the ballot to poll registered voters within city limits. The most cost-effective election would be to place the vote on an election with other items such as fire districts, schools or the hospital. Special elections in February or April would be the next available times that would meet a deadline of the June 15, 2020 council meeting for formal adoption.

• Pass an ordinance banning fireworks without an advisory vote.

• Adopt more restrictions on the dates and hours for discharging fireworks. Some jurisdictions have also adopted laws that authorize specific officials, such as a fire marshal, to prohibit fireworks during emergency conditions such as high fire danger.

• In theory, the council could also adopt a type of emergency declaration that the ordinance is necessary for public health or safety. It would require a majority plus one of the council (five of seven members) to vote in favor.

State law requires any local ordinance that is stricter than state law to have a one-year waiting period before it takes effect. If the council adopted a new law on June 15, 2020, the last meeting before July 4, it would not take effect until June 2021.

Among 20 cities in Snohomish County, Arlington is one of five cities and the unincorporated county that allow discharging fireworks on July 4th only. Four cities defer to state law which permits multiple days and times, while 11 cities, including Marysville, ban them.

According to data provided by Arlington police, the number of fireworks calls in July 2018 was 53, the same as in 2017, with 38 calls in 2016, 42 in 2015 and 54 the year prior. Police fielded 75 fireworks complaints all last year, and typically issues a couple of citations annually for violations, Chief Jonathan Ventura said.

The Arlington Fire Department shared fireworks-related data for the 24-hour July 4th shift over the past three years. Last year, firefighters responded to three fireworks-related fires, one of which required mutual aid, and two EMS calls, one that involved mutual aid. For 2016 and 2017, shift firefighters were called to two fires involving pyrotechnics, and no EMS responses.

“The Fourh of July is historically a busy day for us with increased call volume,” Fire Chief Dave Kraski said. “In 2018 we responded to 23 calls in 24 hours, which is about eight calls above normal. The majority of those are general EMS calls, not fireworks related, but possibly ‘celebration’ related.”

Kraski said 10 of the 2018 calls were logged between 7-11 p.m. The department historically staffs an additional unit for the evening. This year the department hired back two members from 6 p.m. to midnight to staff an extra unit.

More in News

Sue Weiss, 60
                                Work: Retired accountant, City Council
                                Education: Associates degree in Respiratory Therapy, Certificate of Municipal Leadership through Association of Wash. Cities.
Weiss, Blythe square off in Arlington’s only City Council race

ARLINGTON – In the only contested City Council race, Position 4 incumbent… Continue reading

Arlington Walmart Supercenter unveils $4 million remodel

ARLINGTON – Walmart Supercenter has a new look after a $4 million… Continue reading

Courtesy Photo 
                                Joann Rouker and Jeffrey Sims
SMART probe says Marysville police “justified” in shooting death

MARYSVILLE – Nichole Sims called 9-1-1 and said her husband was acting… Continue reading

Police seize weapons from reported neo-Nazi in Arlington

SEATTLE — Police have seized military-style firearms from an avowed neo-Nazi in… Continue reading

Marysville continues to push for more trades classes

MARYSVILLE – Going to college is not the only route to a… Continue reading

Arlington science students get up close with exotic animals on wings of book learning

ARLINGTON- Stillaguamish Valley Learning Center students’ learning was brought to life Oct.… Continue reading

Tolbert, Vanney vie for Arlington mayor

ARLINGTON – Barbara Tolbert is seeking reelection to a third four-year term… Continue reading

Temporary traffic signals go live at Highway 530-Smokey Point Boulevard

ARLINGTON – Temporary traffic signals were officially activated Friday to more efficiently… Continue reading

Most Read