DOUGLAS BUELL/Staff Photo
                                Arlington Mayor Barb Tolbert signs a memorandum of understanding to partner with Marysville and the Port of Everett to foster a booming Cascade Industrial Center manufacturing and industrial employment hub. The event was hosted at Elemental Cider Co. in Arlington, one of the newest businesses within the 4000-acre CIC area near the municipal airport. Seated from left, Port Commissioner David Simpson, Tolbert, Commissioner Glen Bachmann, Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring and Commissioner Tom Stiger.

DOUGLAS BUELL/Staff Photo Arlington Mayor Barb Tolbert signs a memorandum of understanding to partner with Marysville and the Port of Everett to foster a booming Cascade Industrial Center manufacturing and industrial employment hub. The event was hosted at Elemental Cider Co. in Arlington, one of the newest businesses within the 4000-acre CIC area near the municipal airport. Seated from left, Port Commissioner David Simpson, Tolbert, Commissioner Glen Bachmann, Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring and Commissioner Tom Stiger.

Arlington, Marysville, Port of Everett sign pact to grow Cascade Industrial Center together

ARLINGTON – Elected officials from the cities of Arlington, Marysville and the Port of Everett gathered at a new cider taproom in Arlington Wednesday to sign a landmark pact to work together to bring new economic opportunity, high-paying jobs and an expanded tax base to the region.

The taproom was an appropriate venue because it is one of the newest food processing facilities centrally located within the designated 4,000-acre manufacturing and industry hub near Arlington Municipal Airport.

At the ceremony, the mayor and three port commissioners signed a joint memorandum of understanding to memorialize the multi-agency partnership. Many agency officials and community partners attended, taking tours and sharing their visions for the CIC.

Arlington Mayor Barb Tolbert they are looking forward to having the economic tools and knowhow available from the port to expand the tax base, while helping create the 25,000 jobs forecasted within the CIC.

“We’re looking forward to the assets that the port can bring, the challenging parts of economic development, which is bringing in the infrastructure, and bringing in the right type of planning that needs to be done,” she said.

Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring said if the cities hadn’t stuck to their vision for an industrial manufacturing hub 15 years ago, the landscape could have looked a lot different.

“I’ve sat in meetings as a councilmember and had an individual tell me this will never attract manufacturing to this area. You need to rezone it for housing and call it a day.”

Nehring said he took a trip last summer, visiting different parts of the country. In many places, he said, “People and industries were trying to leave, the lights are dimming, and they’re not only not building roads, but not fixing the roads that they have.”

“We need to savor this time and understand the moment that we’re in that we’re going to look back twenty years from now and go, we got it right,” he said.

Through the agreement, the port is positioned to bring more expertise to the table such as financing options and more grant opportunities, planning and environmental support, regulatory strategy and possible expansion of the Foreign Trade – or Trade Free – Zone.

Port Commission President Glen Bachman said Snohomish County is one of only a few in the state that lack a county-wide port district, inadvertently putting the unique economic tools specific to ports out of reach.

Strategically located between Seattle and the Canadian border along the Interstate 5 corridor, the CIC represents the second largest Manufacturing Industrial Center (MIC) in Snohomish County with just over 4,000 acres; 57% in Arlington and 43% in Marysville. The area includes more than 1,700 available acres offering manufacturing and light industrial use potential, including a mix of partially developed, redevelopable and vacant sites.

The bulk of property and proximity to key transportation assets like I-5, state highways, Arlington Municipal Airport, BNSF Railways, and the Port of Everett Seaport make this area an attractive business opportunity.

The Port has been working with both Cities since 2018 and has found that a more official partnership could lend itself to greater participation and support of their local projects. Other partner agencies, including Snohomish County, Greater Seattle Partners and Economic Alliance Snohomish County, have also been major supporters, helping the CIC earn official recognition as a Regional MIC by the Puget Sound Regional Council – one of only 10 recognized state-wide.

The MIC designation provides federal, state and local infrastructure funding preference to the area. This, coupled with the major tax advantages from State-approved property tax exemptions, expedited permitting, and the federal Opportunity Zone designation, has businesses highly motivated to locate in the CIC as evidenced by significant deal making on available lands over the last year.

The agreement will also give the city and port room to evaluate agreements or leases within the CIC for job development, and partner with Washington State University for an incubator for the food processing and seafood industries, along with a possible center in robotics.

Arlington Schools Superintendent Chrys Sweeting also spoke at the signing event to launch a summer internship program for local junior and senior high school students. In the first year, the program hopes to partner with 20 local businesses with 30 students. The students will work 90 hours over the summer and earn 0.5 credits.

Students will be able to connect with local employers to build career-specific skills, gain work experience and help figure out their future career direction.

“It is really important for our students to have hands on, real life experience that is authentic and meaningful,” she said. The district and Arlington plan to host five internships each, and encouraging businesses to join in.

Businesses participating in the internship program will benefit from exposing high school students to real world work experiences, familiarizing them with their workplace, which can lower training time, recruiting costs, and turnover rates.

City and port elected officials and staff are all smiles after signing the Cascade Industrial Center partnership agreement.

City and port elected officials and staff are all smiles after signing the Cascade Industrial Center partnership agreement.

Arlington Public Schools Superintendent Chrys Sweeting talks about a new summer internship program between the district and city that will connect 30 local junior and senior high school students with jobs with local employers.

Arlington Public Schools Superintendent Chrys Sweeting talks about a new summer internship program between the district and city that will connect 30 local junior and senior high school students with jobs with local employers.

Civic and business leaders attend the cities-port memorandum signing ceremony and to learn more background about the Cascade Industrial Center.

Civic and business leaders attend the cities-port memorandum signing ceremony and to learn more background about the Cascade Industrial Center.

Attendees toured the Elemental Cider Co. to learn about the brewing process.

Attendees toured the Elemental Cider Co. to learn about the brewing process.

More in News

Inslee: Stay home for 2 weeks

By Jerry Cornfield and Zachariah Bryan The Herald OLYMPIA — Gov. Jay… Continue reading

Fences have been put up around Marysville playgrounds to keep kids off. (Steve Powell/Staff Photos)
Marysville leaders concerned as (almost) everything’s closing

By Steve Powell spowell@marysvilleglobe.com MARYSVILLE – Within hours of Gov. Jay Inslee’s… Continue reading

Briefly

Beware of coronavirus scams SEATTLE – U.S. Attorney Brian T. Moran is… Continue reading

Jennifer Thompson, left, and her father Ron Thompson secure a new remembrance plaque to the Oso slide site gate on Sunday, near Oso. Ron Thompson handcrafts a new plaque for the gate every year. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Community remembers Oso slide victims, survivors

By Ben Watanabe The Herald OSO — The power of remembering the… Continue reading

People gather to pick up special allergy meals before leaving Lakewood High School on Wednesday in Marysville. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Districts taking meals to students since schools are closed

By Stephanie Davey The Herald LAKEWOOD — Children wearing pajamas stood outside… Continue reading

Jon Nehring
Letter about coronavirus from Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring

This is an edited version of a letter Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring… Continue reading

DOUGLAS BUell/Staff Photos
                                Lead cook Keina Gowins with Presidents Elementary hands out free grab-and-go breakfasts and lunches to students and parents outside the school Wednesday. Presidents and AHS serve as central kitchen sites for preparing meals, which starting next week will expand to 12 delivery sites from Silvana to Oso. Right, Arlington Food Bank executive director Carla Gastineau and Mike Simpson, food bank board president and owner of Arlington Grocery Outlet, partnered with the district with their Meals Til Monday program, and gave a woman a box of donated food while at Presidents.
Arlington students won’t go hungry during the COVID-19 school closures

ARLINGTON – Arlington schools are closed through April 24 to help fight… Continue reading

Scott Beebe hands out Chromebooks to people in their cars. (Steve Powell/Staff Photos)
Marysville parents anxious to pick up school materials for kids

By Steve Powell spowell@marysvilleglobe.com MARYSVILLE – A few days ago Marysville schools… Continue reading

Jon Nehring
Marysville leaders’ trip to D.C. productive

MARYSVILLE – City leaders recently obtained advice on how to get more… Continue reading

Crews will blow garbage into the street and sweep it up over the next few weeks. The city is asking people to move their cars, trash cans and recycle bins when they come around to help them do a thorough job. (Courtesy Photo)
Marysville shuffles workers due to virus, seeks public’s help for sweepers next week

By Steve Powell spowell@marysvilleglobe. MARYSVILLE – From working from home to teleconferencing… Continue reading

City of Arlington carries out operational changes to encourage social distancing

ARLINGTON – The city has made a series of operational changes in… Continue reading