From the Capitol

Bill would allow medical marijuana in schools

  • Saturday, January 19, 2019 1:30am
  • News

OLYMPIA – A bill proposed by Rep. Brian Blake, D-Aberdeen, would allow marijuana on school campuses for students who require aid for medical conditions.

HB 1060 aims to permit students to consume medical marijuana on school property, aboard buses and while attending school-sponsored events. •A proposed law requested by State Attorney General Bob Ferguson and the Department of Health would raise the minimum legal age of sales for tobacco and vapor products from 18 to 21.

The bill, HB 1074, was co-sponsored by a bipartisan group of 11 representatives.

•A proposed bill would allow the residential address portion of a voter registration form to be filled out with a nontraditional address.

Democrat majority caucus chairman Sen. John McCoy, D-Tulalip, pre-filed SB 5079, titled The Native American voting rights act of Washington.

The bill modifies the minimum information required for voter registration under state law, to allow for “unmarked

homes” and “a nontraditional residential address may be used when a voter resides on an Indian reservation or on Indian lands.”

•A bill intended to enhance the safety of hikers, hunters and other outdoor enthusiasts would establish designated target shooting areas on some Department of Natural Resources-managed lands.

Senate Bill 5099 was introduced Tuesday by Sen. Tim Sheldon, D-Mason County. Because of a lack of designated target shooting areas, there is concern that shooting activities might interfere with other recreational activities, such as hiking and camping.

•Gov. Jay Inslee proposed a $54.4 billion state budget that would introduce a capital gains tax on stocks, bonds and other assets.

The proposal would tax capital gains of over $25,000 for individuals and $50,000 for joint filers at a rate of 9 percent.

The tax would raise $975 million in revenue during fiscal year 2021, according to an Office of Financial Management estimate. Homes, farms, and retirement accounts are exempt.

•House Bill 1064, a proposed amendment to De-Escalate Washington- Initiative 940, was unanimously voted through the House Public Safety Committee Tuesday.

I-940, approved by voters by a wide margin last year, added training requirements for law enforcement officers in the areas of de-escalation, mental health and first aid.

Information for these briefs were provided by the WNPA Olympia Bureau consisting of Emma Scher, Madeline Coats, Emma Epperly and Sean Harding.

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