Like many of you, I felt the 4.6 earthquake

Like many others of you in Marysville and Arlington, I felt the 4.6 magnitude earthquake at 2:51 this morning.

It was between Snohomish and Monroe. Its center was under Highway 2. There were eight more shakers in a diagonal line to Lords Hill.

It was felt as far south as Olympia, north to Vancouver, B.C., west to the Peninsula and east to the Cascades.

Like many of you, I was in denial.

I’m a restless sleeper anyway so at first I thought it was my twitching.

Then I thought it was my dog, who can shake the floor when he plops down next to me.

But my dog wasn’t there. He wasn’t even barking, which usually he does when something is amiss.

My wife didn’t wake. So it must have been nothing.

I couldn’t fall back asleep for a while anyway. And I didn’t feel any aftershocks, even one that was reported at 3.5 on the Richter scale three minutes after the first one.

But this morning my initial thoughts were verified – all over social media, then on the news.

Mari-Anne Offerdal Nehring, wife of Marysville Mayor Jon, said on Facebook that it “scared me out of a dead sleep.”

My next-door neighbor in southeast Marysville, Brooke Bornkamp, put a map online that showed where it was and how deep it was, about 14 miles.

Of course the recent quake in California quickly came to mind. And the follow-up story about how unsafe our schools in Marysville are when it comes to earthquakes.

The first earthquake I recall was when I was walking to school in third grade in Puyallup. The road started rolling. I remember looking at telephone poles to make sure one didn’t drop on me. It was April 29, 1965 and was a 6.7.

I was near another one when I lived in Redding, Calif. It was a 6.9 in San Francisco, but we felt it all the way up there. I had a friend in the Bay Area and went to the site where a freeway collapsed. There were 63 fatalities. It was eerie. That was Oct. 17, 1989.

The last one I was near was the Nisqually quake. That was Feb. 28, 2001. It was a 6.8, or 2,000 times stronger than the one today.

Of course now I’m weary of aftershocks. So be careful the next few days and even weeks, especially when driving. That would be freaky if the road started rolling then.

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