Illustration of housing with ground-floor businesses in the proposed 51st Avenue Urban Village project on 20 acres south of Arlington Municipal Airport, and within the Cascade Industrial Center.

Illustration of housing with ground-floor businesses in the proposed 51st Avenue Urban Village project on 20 acres south of Arlington Municipal Airport, and within the Cascade Industrial Center.

Urban village planned on 20 acres south of Arlington Airport

ARLINGTON – Plans for a new urban village are in the works on 20 acres of farmland south of Arlington Municipal Airport and within the Cascade Industrial Center.

Paul Woodmansee, co-founder and president of BYK Construction in Sedro-Woolley, is seeking a conditional use permit from Arlington to build the self-contained, mixed-use neighborhood at 16612 51st Ave.

Named the 51st Avenue Urban Village, it would combine 448 multi-family residential units, 21,982 square feet of office building space and 69,058 square feet of retail space.

The proposed layout from designs by Mount Vernon-based Carletti Architects shows six four-story apartment buildings, eight commercial buildings with upstairs housing and 16 single-family live-work units abutting a large public park. Plenty of parking, walkways, landscaping, utilities and more public spaces round out the project filed in December

“Thousands of jobs are planned, and our housing concept is set up to provide market rate quality housing for the work force those jobs get filled with,” said Woodmansee, who bought the property in June. “The location will allow for residents to walk, bike or take transit to and from work and will assist with causing less congested roads to the CIC region.”

The property is located south of National Food Corp. and north of an old house and Emerald Springs RV Park. It is zoned general commercial, with a mixed-use overlay.

If it sounds like the project’s housing and commercial elements don’t meet the definition of what can be built within the designated 4,000-acre manufacturing and industrial center, consider this a “grandfathered in” project. Arlington community and economic development director Marc Hayes said the city has been working with the developer for two years, well before the CIC’s status was finalized.

Hayes essentially describes the village as a microcosm of the CIC’s concept to have housing merged with business and manufacturers within walking distance where people work, creating what would be less impact on local roads.

Space for new housing is at a premium for meeting future needs in Arlington, he said. The project will help take off some of that pressure.

Other amenities

The centerpiece of the project is a large community park that will have a concrete boardwalk around it with large grass areas, a stage for public events like summer concerts and movies, and public restrooms, Woodmansee said.

“We have situated live/work single-family units along the park in an alley-load (narrow house plan) and boardwalk-like fashion that will be a unique living and working community that creates a vibrant small retail or service area near all the park open space,” he said.

Woodmansee said his team is also talking with Stillaguamish Tribe officials about the ability to build a longhouse example in the park as well, and are recruiting a neighborhood grocery store tenant.

Businesses envisioned for the village would be a mix of small retail shops, medical/dental services, offices, a coffee house, brew pub and restaurants.

Woodmansee said his company is taking advantage of federal tax incentives since the property is in an Opportunity Zone, a program that stimulates capital investment and encourages job creation by giving tax discounts to investors in the project.

Road and traffic

The builder is required to incorporate several roads that will help alleviate stress on busy Highway 531 (172nd Street NE), which is already funded by the state for widening in 2023.

The project will widen 51st Avenue this year, then extend 168th Street NE on the north side of the village west to connect with 169th Street at Smokey Point Boulevard, adding sidewalks, bike paths and landscaping, while a new 47th Avenue will be installed to create a north-south connection to 172nd Street. Eventually, 168th will be extended to 67th Avenue, taking more pressure off 172nd.

The project is anticipated to add 3,870 more daily trips on average to the 172nd area, including 344 more vehicles during peak commuter hours, per traffic studies.

The City Council Jan. 21 awarded a $113,295 contract with Murraysmith to design plans for extending water, sewer and a communications trunk-line under and south of 172nd that would serve the urban village as well as other future CIC tenants.

Contractor BYK Construction hopes to start building this spring or summer. The three-phase project would wrap in summer 2024.

A conditional use permit public hearing will be scheduled in the weeks ahead.

Woodmansee said he was drawn to build in Arlington by the hometown feel of downtown and the people who remind him of his own Sedro-Woolley. He is eager to get the project going.

“Our goal is to make a fresh, vibrant, walkable community urban village that the people will want to live at,” Woodmansee said, “As well as the people of Arlington will want to visit.”

Please note that this story was updated with the correct street on Smokey Point Boulevard to connect with the proposed urban village.

Courtesy City of Arlington
                                One of six apartment buildings in the proposed 51st Avenue Urban Village, which would create a self-contained neighborhood where residents could play and live right where they work.

Courtesy City of Arlington One of six apartment buildings in the proposed 51st Avenue Urban Village, which would create a self-contained neighborhood where residents could play and live right where they work.

Courtesy City of Arlington One of six apartment buildings in the proposed 51st Avenue Urban Village, which would create a self-contained neighborhood where residents could play and live right where they work.

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